Pinterest loves new pins. So, if you could, you should be sharing new pins, preferably all pointing to your website all day. BUT at the same time, you want an engaged audience. The way the smart feed works now, users who repinned one of the pins on your boards are more likely to see more of your pins. So, making use of proven content from other people (by repining) can still help you gain traction.
When we first created Pinterest back in 2010, the idea was to give people a place to collect ideas they found around the internet. But it quickly became so much more than that. What started as a site used by a dozen of our friends grew into a worldwide community of more than 250 million people. A handful of Pins grew into four billion boards, each representing someone’s plans for the future—from epic dream trips to what’s for dinner.
I share Andrew’s perspective, but I would phrase it differently — be relevant! As a brand, before you jump in spend some time “listening” or observing to get an understanding of the platform and then map your Pinterest strategy accordingly. Look at your target audience, the types of boards they’ve created, and the content they’re pinning. How does your content fit in with that? How does Pinterest fit with your overall social marketing/business strategy?
I think we need to finish that sentence from Pinterest’s terms of service, for clarification’s sake. It reads, “…you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit such Member Content only on, through or by means of the Site, Application or Services. Cold Brew Labs does not claim any ownership rights in any such Member Content and nothing in these Terms will be deemed to restrict any rights that you may have to use and exploit any such Member Content.”
Yeah, Anshul, I gotta admit – I didn’t see the point of Pinterest for a long time. I thought it was another pared-down Facebook knock-off. But then I started using it and can really see all the different ways it can be used for marketing. Plus, it’s now driving over HALF the traffic to my site, and I’m just getting started! I saw an immediate boost to traffic and mailing list signups. It’s been a huge boon for me.
Same applies to on-site content. Google is already displaying tons of content directly in the search, Facebook also has tons of features preventing people from ever leaving their app and Pinterest is already starting with rich pins for recipes. I believe they might try to offer publishers the “opportunity” to create rich content within the Pinterest app. But no visits to your blog means no money, so you will have to look for different traffic sources or different ways to make money.
I know, there are countless Pinterest courses out there. Some cost up to 300 USD. Are they better? I don’t know. I just know that I put everything I know about Pinterest into this guide and didn’t hold anything back. This guide is my way of saying thanks to all those countless guides that helped me starting out as a travel blogger more than 3 years ago.
Start Pinterest group Boards. Besides seeking membership in a popular Pinterest group Board, you might also seek to start one and invite your customers. This can help you to establish social proof, thought leadership, or perform customer research. A social proof Board could be created to invite people to show off how they use your product. A customer research Board can be used to invite customers to provide input on future or current products.
Ad group. This is where you decide on your budget, where to display your ads, your target audience, and how long the ads will run. Also, depending on the objective, you can have more than one ad group in each campaign. For example, if you’re a clothing retailer, your campaign can focus on driving traffic to your website while each ad group is dedicated to specific products — one group for women’s dresses and another for men’s suits.

Pinterest makes it very clear that vertical aspect ratio is imperative when creating content for Pinterest audiences. Pins on Pinterest are recommended to be 2:3 — 600px wide x 900px high. These are the ideal dimensions so users can see the image in the best possible way. Vertical images also prove to be better for engagement because they take up more space in Pinterest’s kanban format, which takes up more real estate on users’ devices which is ideal for brands. Pinterest discusses the importance of the vertical aspect ratio and proper dimensions in their Creative Approach to Pinterest article.
Include relevant keywords in your targeting options. Pinterest allows you to add up to 150 keywords in a promoted pin, but most marketers make the mistake of trying to add as many as possible. This results in low click-throughs and conversions. Try to have a focused and targeted approach with Pinterest keywords. This isn't Google Adwords, so you need to think about how your target customer uses Pinterest every day and target those keywords. The keywords chosen shouldn’t only be focused on targeting users, but should also maintain context with what’s offered in the pin and the web page they’re redirected to.
Pinterest operates differently than other popular social media platforms. Many people don’t use the network for broadcasting content to their followers — they use it to save valuable ideas, products, and content for a later time. Since many consumers save products to go back and purchase them later, Pinterest is the perfect tool for businesses selling products or content. In fact, 93% of users plan purchases with Pinterest, and 87% actually make a purchase because of something they saw on the platform.
Once you download, install and activate the Social Warfare Pro plugin, head over to the Display tab and be sure to include the Pinterest button in your active set. I like to include Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter, but if you’re in a B2B niche, you might want to include LinkedIn as well. Keep it lean, though, as the last thing you want to do is overwhelm visitors with too many choices.

Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.
You can start using Jarvee from just $19.99 a month, which makes it an affordable option. It’s a great alternative if you’re still small and don’t want to throw too much into third-party promotion. At the other end of the scale, Jarvee also has packages that accommodate for 150+ accounts, so if you’re a big business and are looking to outsource on a much larger scale, Jarvee has this option as well.
Join Pinterest group Boards. Group boards are shared boards where many different users are invited to contribute. They are differentiated from personal boards by the use of a special group icon. Pinners who follow the group Board show up as followers of the owner only, but all Pins to the group Board, from all contributors, can show up in the home feed of every Pinner who follows it. Think of the implications of joining a group Board with a contributor who has over 100,000 followers! Use a tool like PinGroupie to determine which group Boards you should seek membership to.
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