May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
One example of a successful campaign was the one that they ran last year. The furniture retailer realized that back-to-school was one of their key seasons because students are going to college and they have both limited budgets and space. Add that to the fact that about 50% of millennials use Pinterest, and there’s a massive opportunity for selling to college students.
Pinterest is so cool. I started uploading some of my blog content yesterday to my new Pinterest account. The emails started coming fast and furious. Almost all of my repinners were women and they loved two of my categories… diet and organization. In just one afternoon I received 23 e-mails, each with notification of multiple pins, likes, or comments. Since a lot of my content is linked back to my blog, the traffic there was up a lot as well.

For example, instead of pinning a product photo of your brand’s lawn mower that includes a title describing the type of lawn mower that it is, a description detailing the lawn mower’s capabilities and including a link back to your lawn mower’s product page, it’s a more effective Pinterest marketing strategy to pin an image of your lawn mower actually mowing a lawn with a title that says something to the effect of “How to Get Perfectly Cut Golf Course Grass at Home” including a description that discusses what perfectly cut, golf course-like grass is and how this lawn mower can help you achieve it, and then link to your lawn mower’s product page.


As we discussed at the beginning of the article, content on Pinterest successfully gains engagement and shows up as a search result for months, so the content of your titles and descriptions need to be able to withstand that test of time. Titles and descriptions that are evergreen – as in, they don’t date themselves or refer to a very specific day or time of the year – have greater lasting potential. Some content on Pinterest will be season specific, such as content for recurring holidays, and that’s okay, but think about how you can even make descriptions for seasonal pins stay relevant for the same time of year next year.
Right now, Pinterest has only confirmed they are using hashtags for certain specific searches. These hashtag searches (say “Bali”) are, allegedly, shown in a chronological order. Meaning fresh pins with hashtags (up to 20, but I wouldn’t overdo it to keep your descriptions tidy) are more likely to appear in those searches and thus able to create the coveted engagement. Pinterest has said they are working on new uses for hashtags so better not skip them (even though old guides will tell you to do so!)
Lastly, under the Social Warfare > Advanced tab, you can set a number of global Pinterest options such as telling Social Warfare to use your feature image as a fallback when you don’t add a Pinterest-specific image to a particular post. You can select the option to have your Pinterest-specific post image automatically inserted into your post, or remain hidden and come up when a visitor is using the Pinterest browser extension.
You need to make sure your ads follow our standard ad guidelines and any country-specific guidelines. You need to follow all applicable local laws, regulations and industry codes for any area your ads will be shown in. You must also follow our community guidelines, terms and the above advertising guidelines. These advertising guidelines apply to all parts of your promoted content, including the image, description and destination—and they apply to features like audience targeting.
Similar to other social networks, Pinterest contains a plethora of images and videos. Not only do you want to ensure you’re posting images and videos that will help you promote your brand and market your products/ services, but you’ll also want to ensure they stand out against all of the others on the platform. Otherwise, why would a user choose to follow you over your competition?

The number one Pinterest tip I can give you is to be true to your brand in your Pinnable images. Create a certain recognizable style. Always use the same font, logo or watermark, and other elements when you add an image to a blog post. Over time people will start to recognize you for your pictures on Pinterest. Those pictures give them an incentive to take a look on your blog to see if you’ve updated lately. That means more traffic for you, all by simply being true to your brand. 
Pinning from websites means you’re adding fresh content into the mix. This kind of rings a bell within the Pinterest hamster cage and says “Woah, hold on a sec, here’s someone providing something new. We like them!”. If the images you’re pinning are high quality, look amazing and link to a valuable source, Pinterest will in turn see you as a valuable user. 

Start by providing lots of value on your website with free content. For example, a business coach could regularly publish content based on questions that clients ask during coaching sessions or in a Facebook group. The resulting blog articles and/or videos need to be extremely helpful and practical. They should provide ideas and information that people are searching for on Pinterest and Google.

Include calls to action in the description. Pinterest doesn’t allow you to use direct calls to action (CTAs) in the promoted pin description, but that doesn’t mean your campaign should lack one. The targeted user needs to know what he is expected to do after seeing the pin. However, it is important to remain contextual and not sound too "salesy." Subtle CTAs such as "Sign up today for a free trial," or "Download this free guide," are things that users will still engage with.


Similar to other social networks, Pinterest contains a plethora of images and videos. Not only do you want to ensure you’re posting images and videos that will help you promote your brand and market your products/ services, but you’ll also want to ensure they stand out against all of the others on the platform. Otherwise, why would a user choose to follow you over your competition?


This will take you to Business Account Basics. If you scroll down that page, you will see a section entitled Profile. Here, you want to fill out each section, including uploading your logo where it says Picture. You also want to take a few minutes to write a description that is interesting and has a few keywords that people may use when they are searching for what your business does or the type of products your offer.
No one likes to follow or connect with you if you have an incomplete profile or empty board. Some marketers only create one or two pins and do not login regularly enough. As a result, this will affect the marketing plan of your brand. So, if you don’t have enough content to pin on board regularly, you can use a secret board and keep pinning to it. When you have enough pins you can share them one by one according to your requirements.
So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.
Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.
You’re always going to find the standard tips you read everywhere: use high-quality images; focus on a long vertical with bright colors; craft a killer headline. But the most surprising piece of advice I have received is to practice skillful social listening on Pinterest. Find the people who have pinned your content by going to Pinterest.com/Source/[YourURL]. Then, leave them a comment thanking them for pinning it. This is so easy, yet it is such a rare occurrence that this simple gesture roots you in the mind of those people who have already encountered and enjoyed your content. This is a powerful way to build a devoted following. 
Start Pinterest group Boards. Besides seeking membership in a popular Pinterest group Board, you might also seek to start one and invite your customers. This can help you to establish social proof, thought leadership, or perform customer research. A social proof Board could be created to invite people to show off how they use your product. A customer research Board can be used to invite customers to provide input on future or current products.

For example, instead of pinning a product photo of your brand’s lawn mower that includes a title describing the type of lawn mower that it is, a description detailing the lawn mower’s capabilities and including a link back to your lawn mower’s product page, it’s a more effective Pinterest marketing strategy to pin an image of your lawn mower actually mowing a lawn with a title that says something to the effect of “How to Get Perfectly Cut Golf Course Grass at Home” including a description that discusses what perfectly cut, golf course-like grass is and how this lawn mower can help you achieve it, and then link to your lawn mower’s product page.
The benefits for marketers are huge. And here’s one of the biggest and best parts of Buyable Pins: Pinterest doesn’t take a cut of your sales. There’s no commission. You keep every dollar you make on the sales you get from Buyable Pins. Though that has the potential to change down the line if Buyable Pins see a lot of success, for now marketers are using them with no drawbacks.
Pinterest boards group together content with the same theme. For example, DAVIDsTEA — which has corporate partnerships — categorizes its boards based on seasonal teas, cooking with tea, tea-infused cocktails, and more. DAVIDsTEA’s boards are carefully pieced together to include the types of information their audience will enjoy. In addition to creating awesome boards, be sure to link all the content in your boards to your website or a landing page — within reason, of course — so you’re reiterating your messaging, as well as your organization.
This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.
Enter Pingroupie. This free tool’s entire purpose is to list group boards that are currently live. You could reach out to these board owners and see if they’d be open to doing a group board with you, or if they’re in need of contributors like you. If you’re able to contribute relevant, non-spammy content of your own, there could be a lot to gain for your brand.

May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster 
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