So, please whatever you do, don’t just post product photos. Do you remember that study done by The University of Minnesota? Well, diversity of pin was the 8th most important factor when users were deciding whether to follow an account. So, throw in some other boards that give your followers added value in order to avoid coming off as overly salesy.
Really fab tips and just what I was looking for, as I stumble around on Pinterest. I tweeted it through the sharing buttons and I noticed that your Twitter name wasn't automatically provided (I like including the Twitter name when I share someone's posts as it thanks them). Yet I'm sure that when I've shared your posts in the pasts, the click-through link has included your Twitter name....just thought I'd mention it.
Like we said at the beginning of this article, Pinterest is optimized for brands because Pinterest users love to discover new products and businesses on the platform, so Pinterest makes it easy for businesses to use it to promote their products and brand. Because of this, they have plenty of great resources that can help you optimize your Pinterest marketing strategy and get the most out of your Pinterest for business account.
But Pinterest is different and they follow a different approach. More to the point: My first viral pin, created in April 2015, now has more than 66.000 repins and still sends about 40 people to my site every day (click to see it, even though it looks oddly old-fashioned now). All in all, a bit less than 100.00 visitors. Do you know how many followers I had at that time? Less than 1.000 (around 800ish).

My wife got me into Pinterest which I initially just wrote off as “another” social media site. Great article Beth. I will have to follow you and see how to use all these techniques first-hand. It seems like the web in general is evolving into a more picture oriented communication medium. Pinterest is the future, here now. I can see Google having a picture based search only option in the not too distant future.


Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
Monetization: Currently, Pinterest is not a very successful business. Unlike Facebook, they are not reaping billions each year. At one point they need to cash in and this will probably lead to less traffic to your website. Why is this important? I am not entirely sure you should lay all your eggs in the Pinterest basket anymore. Try to diversify (SEO or be an early discover for a new medium). It’s just a hunch, but traffic potential from Pinterest might just be about to see its peak.

With 200 million monthly users, Pinterest may not be a social media behemoth like Facebook, but it’s an important social platform with deep penetration in valuable demographics. Half of all U.S. millennials use Pinterest, for instance. But it’s not just young people saving their ideas on the network: 68 percent of U.S. women between the ages of 25 and 54 use Pinterest, too. And while it’s true that the network does have more female users than male, 40 percent of new users are men.
Pinterest is the ultimate visual search engine and the world’s catalog of ideas, and it’s the only social media platform that enables users to plan for the future rather than share the present or reflect on the past. With a Pinterest for business account, brands can create and manage a Pinterest marketing strategy that boosts brand awareness and drives traffic and conversions to their website. In this article, we discuss in detail what Pinterest marketing offers brands in terms of marketing power and what a Pinterest for business account can do for a business and their bottom line.
So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.
My best Pinterest tip is to pin like your followers. Your followers do not pin from just 10:00-10:30 am every single weekday. Sure, you can schedule your pins out, but remember that your perfect follower (and possible blog reader) sleeps, eats, works, takes care of children, has doctor’s appointments, etc. They don’t have a schedule of when they pin, they pin when they can. Since I’ve started using Pinterest as just a regular person vs. blogger trying to drive traffic, I’ve seen my number of followers increase quickly. Of course, my tip may not work for everyone, but it doesn’t hurt to play with your pinning strategy to gauge results. Take a strategy and try it for 2 weeks, analyze, tweak, and happy pinning!
One thing I have noticed and wondered about, when I first opened my Pinterest account I was able to leave comments on a persons profile, when someone started following me I would always comment ‘thanks for the follow’ or if I started following someone I would leave them a comment about how wonderful their boards were. Do you know anything of this feature??
I’ve joined Pinterest and hooked it up to my business site. So far I haven’t really noticed any great increase in my site’s traffic due to Pinterest. But I agree…Pinterest is becoming huge and I think finally surpassed LinkedIn as one of the top three. Might as well play along! 🙂 Good tips though…I certainly started looking through my pins to see if and where I could I apply some of your advice.
The answer is two! I discuss more WHY in this post, but when we are resharing our top evergreen or seasonal content, you should be pinning directly from the landing page/blog post, OR, using Tailwind to reschedule the pin. All pins from Tailwind will also count as ‘fresh pins’. Pinterest is really favoring new and fresh content, but you don’t have to constantly churn out new content. The next tip can help with that!
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster 

Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part Two): Consider watermarking your images, or adding text to them. If you’re using your own images on Pinterest, one of the best ways to help your image stand out is by adding a clear description to the image itself, or adding a watermark with your business name. Make sure it’s clear, but that it doesn’t block out the main subject of the photo.
“Instagramming for business has gotten so much easier thanks to Tailwind! After using similar websites to schedule Instagrams, I have found Tailwind to be the easiest and most straightforward! I've rarely needed support from Tailwind but the few times I did, the team answered my questions or concerns so quickly. Overall I'm thrilled to be a part of Tailwind and would highly recommend it!”
Pinning from websites means you’re adding fresh content into the mix. This kind of rings a bell within the Pinterest hamster cage and says “Woah, hold on a sec, here’s someone providing something new. We like them!”. If the images you’re pinning are high quality, look amazing and link to a valuable source, Pinterest will in turn see you as a valuable user. 
Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.

Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part One): Use images in every single post you write, so your post can be shared on Pinterest. When you find yourself getting lazy about this, remember –- not using an image in your post means no one will pin it. And remember — the prettier the picture is, the more it will get pinned. The images that appeal to Pinterest members are powerful and emotive, so keep that in mind when choosing your pictures. That combination tends to work well for your blog readers, too.
The last step is to create your first board. To make it easier for users to find your content, such as blogs, special offers, new products, and more — create a business board first and then add relevant Pins. For example, for blog content you’ve posted on your first board, you can then create feature images for each blog post and include a summary of the post in the description to pique user interest.
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
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