Writing targeted, specific and compelling descriptions of your boards will make them easier to find for your audience as well. A Pinterest board description can be up to 500 characters, but most descriptions should be a sentence or two with 25 words being the ideal length. You want your board descriptions to use two to four targeted keywords and be as industry-, niche- and content-specific as possible.


Hi Elna! Thanks for the great info. I plan on checking out Tailwind today! I have two pinterest accounts and they both have approximately 100,000 followers on each. I am also on several group boards. I generally avoid pinning images that link to my website on them, as I’m not sure if board owners would be bothered by this. I’d love to know your thoughts on this.
If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.
It is more effective to Pin multiple times a day than to Pin all at once. This is because the more consistently you Pin, the more Pinterest’s Smart Feed will show your pins. Your goal is to Pin five times per day. You can work up to this number by starting with two pins a day of your content and two repins. However, to be most effective you want to work up to pinning and repinning 10 times a day.

You should also repin content that your audience would like to your boards. No matter how much content you create, your audience will want more. Repinning other people’s content helps give that to them. It also helps build rapport with those whose content your repinning to share with your audience. You should view your social media content as being a resource to those that follow you, so give them valuable content, both yours and others.
Use Pinterest’s embed option to publish pins as content in your blog posts and website pages. Note: As Pinterest is catching on, you may need to tell your users that they need to click on a Pinterest image to get to the original source. When I tried this last week, a reader wrote to me and asked, “Is there more to that Pin thing? Or is it just a pretty image?”
15. Social Media Examiner: Social Media Examiner doesn’t exclusively publish Pinteret or visual marketing tips, but the ones that are published here are of the highest quality as they are written by people who have a vast knowledge of Pinterest. So make sure you read their posts on using Pinterest for business regularly. They also have some good articles on visual marketing.

The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
Continue to bid aggressively. The good thing about Pinterest advertising is that you only pay for the number of clicks you get. Thus, marketers should continuously measure performance and adjust their bid prices accordingly to maximize results. While the initial bid could be high, once the ad gains momentum, you'll see a drop in bid price, especially with pins that receive a high level of organic engagement and interaction. The idea is to keep testing your ads and bid aggressively to optimize your clicks and conversions to meet your goals.
8. Not installing the “Pin It” button on your browser. While this won’t actually make you look dumb on Pinterest, it’s simply something you’ve got to do! The “pin it” button makes it super easy to curate content from any website. With a quick click, you can pin an image that contains a description and a website link. Simply highlight the text you want as the description before you click “Pin it.”
As detailed in this article, Why Pinterest is 1,680 Times Better than Facebook, pins are so much more discoverable on Pinterest than other social platforms and for so much longer, which is what makes the platform so advantageous for businesses to use. Unlike Facebook and Twitter, whose posts have a half-life (the time in which the post accumulates half of all its interactions) measured in minutes, the average half-life of a Pinterest post is three and a half months. Because the life of pins lasts so much longer they have a greater potential reach, so businesses can use Pinterest to interact with users much earlier in their purchasing process.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.
Pinning from websites means you’re adding fresh content into the mix. This kind of rings a bell within the Pinterest hamster cage and says “Woah, hold on a sec, here’s someone providing something new. We like them!”. If the images you’re pinning are high quality, look amazing and link to a valuable source, Pinterest will in turn see you as a valuable user. 
Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again!
When you publish your post, you pin that post to Pinterest. Usually people pin that first pin from their blog to their own board. Then you go to THAT board and pin THAT pin. You don’t make a new pin or go back to your blog and pin it again. You want to establish repins, or shares, on that ONE pin. So repin that ONE pin over and over again and others will repin that pin for you!

Think of Pinterest as a bookmarking tool that people use to plan their lives. People typically save - or “pin” in Pinterest jargon - images they find on the web or on Pinterest itself to different boards (collections of images around a specific topic). The pictures are clickable and link back to a webpage where further information about the image topic can be found.
Hector – it’s possible that the difference actually has to do with the pictures themselves. When I pin a blog post that has awesome content but a so-so picture that’s not very evocative, it normally doesn’t do very well on Pinterest. But when the photo is a great one, it gets passed around like crazy! I know it’s tough to find business-related photos that aren’t cheesy stock images, but it’s worth doing some digging. I’d advise testing out some different photos out and tracking your results per photo. Best of luck!
When users click within this feed they’ll find more shoppable Pins related to their original search. Make sure your ads show up here by using high-quality images that appeal to your audience — first, understand what product features they’re searching for and use images that showcase these details — and incorporate keywords your audience searches for.

I think the underlying major issue here is that NO ONE marketing tactic works. If it did, we’d all stick to enhancing our websites to be the best they could be. But no – blogs became popular because you could engage the consumer in a “conversation” via comments and they seem to lure more followers than a static website does. And then FB and Twitter and others, and now Pinterest. No one method seems perfect so business owners are all over the place trying every thing they can. Kind of makes you crazy…Now Pinterest is hot but as someone posted above, I, too, cannot get the search to work. I have searched on terms I know are on my own board names or pin descriptions and nothing comes up. It seems you have to know someone is on Pinterest and then begin following them… so I don’t know if a business can acquire new followers by someone generically searching on their subject matter if the search engine is so weird. But that brings me back to the Pinterest terms which say “no commercial use”!
Thanks for stopping by and commenting! Yes! Join more group boards! But, I thought you were already on a lot? Oh, maybe that’s FB 🙂 As for the interval function, I had no idea that was an option in Tailwind. I honestly don’t stay in the dashboard of Tailwind so I’m learning as I go. How is that different from scheduling them based on your schedule? Is this so you don’t “spam” a group board? So far I haven’t had that happened even when I was scheduling 200 pins a day. I’ll go over to Lady Boss League and find that post! Thanks
These are two vastly different approaches to the same end result – getting users to click on the pin and go through to your lawn mower’s product page – but the first example will only help you acquire users who were interested in finding a lawn mower in the first place, while the second example will help you appeal to users interested in having a beautiful lawn and a well-kept home. By appealing to user’s interests through this type of content on Pinterest, they’ll be more inclined to purchase your product because you’ve demonstrated how your product can help them achieve the results they want.

Use Pinterest to show the trends or patterns happening within your industry and what you’re doing to make strides based on these trends. Promoting industry trends in Pinterest gives your audience different perspectives into their current strategies and what you can do to help them. For example, IBM has a board called “Tech in Healthcare” that shows how different types of data helps them to make better decisions.
To start off with, using Pinterest for business purposes is something that Pinterest itself has spent time, effort and energy optimizing, and they’ve made it very easy for businesses to understand how to use Pinterest for business. Using Pinterest for business purposes is slightly different from most social media platforms and also slightly different from search engines like Google, so it’s important to approach your Pinterest marketing strategy a little bit differently as well.
You can now confirm your Instagram, YouTube and Etsy account on Pinterest. Why does this matter? It matters in two ways! One, when people pin your content from those platforms TO Pinterest, your account will get attributed with engagement. Your impressions, visibility and engagement will go up. I’ve noticed, after confirming these platforms with my client’s accounts, that fans were pinning their items on Pinterest all along.

You mention linking our Pinterest to our Facebook pages, but if we are a business and have a Facebook page, how can we link our Pinterest since pages don’t really have their own log-in?? If I try to link to Facebook, it picks up my personal Facebook account (and I’m admin of my page.) Do you know if an interface with Facebook pages for Pinterest is coming? Or I’m just going to post links on Facebook to my Pinterest boards is my plan. Thanks for the article-lots of great info!

Technically, we are building out an internet scale personalized recommendation engine in 22+ languages, which requires a deep understanding of the users and content on our platform.  As an engineer on the Pin Knowledge team, you’ll work on content classification, user modeling, personalization and ranking. Engineers of this team often make measurably positive impact on hundreds of millions of users with improved machine learning modeling and featurization breakthroughs.


I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  


It’s hard to choose just one, but I think my best Pinterest tip would be to take the time to really understand how Pinterest works. Just like any form of social media, you’ll see best results if you understand what Pinterest is and how to best use it for YOUR brand. Do your research, experiment with different ideas, pay attention to the analytics, tweak your strategy, and above all have fun with it! 

The typical Pinterest Software Engineer salary is $133,518. Software Engineer salaries at Pinterest can range from $106,654 - $197,484. This estimate is based upon 82 Pinterest Software Engineer salary report(s) provided by employees or estimated based upon statistical methods. When factoring in bonuses and additional compensation, a Software Engineer at Pinterest can expect to make an average total pay of $139,998 . See all Software Engineer salaries to learn how this stacks up in the market.
The connection between Pinterest and blogging is crystal clear and can be significantly beneficial to most bloggers. SEO, or search engine optimization, helps blogger content to be seen by the millions of potential readers conducting searches on sites such as Google and Bing each day. Imagine that Pinterest is one more place for potential readers to both find and share your content, but rather than searching on Google or Bing, they’re searching on Pinterest itself.

How are you and your family doing, I hope all is well. My name is Larry Ward Sr. I was searching through Pinterest for boards to follow. I came across your blogging post, I’m interested in being a blogger. I don’t have any experience how can I learn how to write good blogs. This is something I have been wanting to do for a very long time. Any advice you have to get me started on my journey would be appreciated. I love the details and sources that you provide. Thank you for all your help sincerely
Specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-limited. What do you want to achieve and when do you want to achieve it by. Do you want to increase your followers to 100 by the end of the quarter; or do you want a Pinterest ad to generate at least five bathroom tile sales by the end of the month? Being specific gives you a goal to aim for, it focuses your Pinterest marketing tools, and it helps you to monitor (and learn from) your successes.

Hi Elna! Thanks for the great info. I plan on checking out Tailwind today! I have two pinterest accounts and they both have approximately 100,000 followers on each. I am also on several group boards. I generally avoid pinning images that link to my website on them, as I’m not sure if board owners would be bothered by this. I’d love to know your thoughts on this.

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