The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.

Include calls to action in the description. Pinterest doesn’t allow you to use direct calls to action (CTAs) in the promoted pin description, but that doesn’t mean your campaign should lack one. The targeted user needs to know what he is expected to do after seeing the pin. However, it is important to remain contextual and not sound too "salesy." Subtle CTAs such as "Sign up today for a free trial," or "Download this free guide," are things that users will still engage with.

First, do some searching on Pinterest so that you understand how Pinterest searching works. Then, take note of which results show up first and how the Pinterest feed organizes the pins and boards. Notice which keywords are suggested as being together automatically and which of these keywords are relevant to your pins. You want to do these searches on both desktop and mobile devices so that you understand what looks different on each device.
Promoted Pins (aka Pinterest ads) are a great way to get your Pins seen by more people, creating new exposure for your brand. But Promoted Pins can provide exposure well beyond what you pay for. Internal Pinterest data shows that advertisers get an average of 20 percent more organic clicks in the month following the launch of a Pinterest ad campaign.
With your Pinterest for business account, you can view analytics like what pins people are liking on your profile and what they save from your website, and you can learn more about what content users would like to see more of from your profile. You can also discover your audience metrics including their demographic information and what their other interests are.
Patricia, those are great tips too. I really wish the folks at Pinterest would get back to me about its commercial use. Maybe their initial thoughts were not for business use and now that it’s taken off as it has, they may be rethinking the rules but it would be great to have clarification because I’ll be out there creating my own business board if I feel comfortable knowing it’s in keeping with their terms!

Pinterest loves new pins. So, if you could, you should be sharing new pins, preferably all pointing to your website all day. BUT at the same time, you want an engaged audience. The way the smart feed works now, users who repinned one of the pins on your boards are more likely to see more of your pins. So, making use of proven content from other people (by repining) can still help you gain traction.
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
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