While Pinterest is well-known for its food, health and travel posts, it’s also a platform that can take ordinary or even dry topics and make them engaging and interesting. For example, website developers and financial planners all successfully use Pinterest to teach “dry” topics like banking and coding. Divorce attorneys and project managers can offer their most helpful content to those who are searching for answers or the latest inspirations on that topic.
 I’ve seen articles advising on the best times to Pin as well, but I generally take these with a pinch of salt as the content I pin spreads across International time zones. Also, you’ll find that a good pin will have a MUCH longer shelf-life than something on Twitter or Facebook. People are still pinning my old stuff months later – that simply doesn’t happen on most other social networks!
Hi! Great post! I’ve only just gotten back to Pinterest after ignoring it (I know, I know) and just started using Tailwind. What do you mean about dripping your posts over the course of a week or month? What exactly is the strategy there, and how do you do it? Also, how do you get 100 recommended optimal times with the free tailwind? They only offered me three optimal times to start. Did you just add to that general time period manually, or am I missing something? Thanks!
Now, it’s not a good idea to create Pinterest Boards that are covered in nothing but pins from your own blog. One of the cardinal rules of social media is that you promote others more than yourself. With that said, it certainly behooves you to create Boards related to your content so that you can include your own posts as a small portion of each Board.
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