Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
How to Start a Pinterest Board That Succeeds: Are your prospects on Pinterest? Do you want to start a Pinterest board? When starting on Pinterest, you’ll want to fill new boards with quality starter pins. Once you’ve launched your new boards, it’s important to pin more content to them daily. This article shows how to develop Pinterest boards for your business.
Monetization: Currently, Pinterest is not a very successful business. Unlike Facebook, they are not reaping billions each year. At one point they need to cash in and this will probably lead to less traffic to your website. Why is this important? I am not entirely sure you should lay all your eggs in the Pinterest basket anymore. Try to diversify (SEO or be an early discover for a new medium). It’s just a hunch, but traffic potential from Pinterest might just be about to see its peak.
Pinterest has confirmed they do crawl the website linked to the pin. So, it’s quite important that your pin & pin description match the actual content on your website. For now, they are probably just scraping the metadata (descriptions, title, etc). But still, it’s nice to know that an SEO optimized article will also send a stronger signal to Pinterest.

Once you sign up for a Pinterest account, you’re able to begin sharing content and, therefore, social media marketing on the platform. You have the option to upload your business’ content from your computer or mobile device, Pin content you find on the platform, or add content you find on the web using the Pinterest browser button. You can also follow the boards of your friends and competitors, “Like”, and comment on others’ Pins, re-Pin (or repost) content, and share links to your website and blog in your Pins.
Something I’ve been struggling to figure out is how to pin many pins a day, while keeping a good chunk of them as pins from my own content. I only publish new content once a week. Let’s say I want to post 50% my content and 50% of others’, I would only be pinning two pins per day (one for my new post and one of someone else). Am I supposed to be pinning older content that’s already in those boards? If so, how often should I be doing that? I just don’t understand how people say to pin X number of pins per day and X amount should be your own content. Help! Thanks, Rachel
It has over 200 million monthly global users and boasts over 100 billion Pins. And it gets better. Research by ecommerce platform Shopify found that it was the #2 source of all referral traffic to the site, that 93% of users were using it to plan their purchases, and that the average resulting order value was $50 (higher than any other social media source).

Writing targeted, specific and compelling descriptions of your boards will make them easier to find for your audience as well. A Pinterest board description can be up to 500 characters, but most descriptions should be a sentence or two with 25 words being the ideal length. You want your board descriptions to use two to four targeted keywords and be as industry-, niche- and content-specific as possible.
Use Pinterest’s embed option to publish pins as content in your blog posts and website pages. Note: As Pinterest is catching on, you may need to tell your users that they need to click on a Pinterest image to get to the original source. When I tried this last week, a reader wrote to me and asked, “Is there more to that Pin thing? Or is it just a pretty image?”

Once you’ve made the audience decisions, choose a maximum cost-per-click bid. Remember, it’s the amount you’d be willing to pay per click, so you’ll never pay more than that. However, you won’t necessarily have to pay such a high amount, especially since there’s not that much competition with early adopters. For example, one of my clients put $1 as her maximum, but was only charged $0.13 per click.

Join Pinterest group Boards. Group boards are shared boards where many different users are invited to contribute. They are differentiated from personal boards by the use of a special group icon. Pinners who follow the group Board show up as followers of the owner only, but all Pins to the group Board, from all contributors, can show up in the home feed of every Pinner who follows it. Think of the implications of joining a group Board with a contributor who has over 100,000 followers! Use a tool like PinGroupie to determine which group Boards you should seek membership to.


Business-to-consumer (B2C) companies in general have a much easier time on Pinterest than business-to-business (B2B) companies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible for the latter to get traction on the platform. Ultimately, whether or not Pinterest is a good fit for your business will depend heavily on whether or not your target audience overlaps with their existing user base.
Hi Elna! Thanks for the great info. I plan on checking out Tailwind today! I have two pinterest accounts and they both have approximately 100,000 followers on each. I am also on several group boards. I generally avoid pinning images that link to my website on them, as I’m not sure if board owners would be bothered by this. I’d love to know your thoughts on this.
Great experts here Sue! I loved reading through all of this. Especially was interested in what Ilene Smith said about the "Picked for You". I had not noticed that one factor about them...that they are all new. But it happened to me the other night. 4 pins from the same board went crazy all at once (crazy like I don't see on food content that is not my niche). I know it was Pinterest showing these "appetizers" to other users in Picked for you. And within a few hour it was over! So TRUE! Consistent pinning all day long is important!
While Pinterest is well-known for its food, health and travel posts, it’s also a platform that can take ordinary or even dry topics and make them engaging and interesting. For example, website developers and financial planners all successfully use Pinterest to teach “dry” topics like banking and coding. Divorce attorneys and project managers can offer their most helpful content to those who are searching for answers or the latest inspirations on that topic.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
Follow these Pinterest marketing tactics to develop your blog. On your blog, place striking images with your blog posts, add easy engagement mechanics like the Pinterest Pin It and Follow Me buttons. On Pinterest, reach out to like-minded pinners and be sure to add calls to action on the blog posts you pin on Pinterest. These are a great start for increasing your website traffic and visibility.
Pinterest boards group together content with the same theme. For example, DAVIDsTEA — which has corporate partnerships — categorizes its boards based on seasonal teas, cooking with tea, tea-infused cocktails, and more. DAVIDsTEA’s boards are carefully pieced together to include the types of information their audience will enjoy. In addition to creating awesome boards, be sure to link all the content in your boards to your website or a landing page — within reason, of course — so you’re reiterating your messaging, as well as your organization.

Promoted Pins (aka Pinterest ads) are a great way to get your Pins seen by more people, creating new exposure for your brand. But Promoted Pins can provide exposure well beyond what you pay for. Internal Pinterest data shows that advertisers get an average of 20 percent more organic clicks in the month following the launch of a Pinterest ad campaign.
I’m so new to all of this. I’m a wedding music looking to engage with brides and grooms. On my website I’ve included a few blog posts so far, but absolutely need to make the content better and with more images. I’m just at a loss sometimes for inspiration on what to write about. On my business Pinterest account, I’ve included boards to help inspire brides and grooms. Pretty much the only ones that redirect back to my website/blog are on my Texas Harmony board. What in the world should I do to change the number of conversions from people clicking to actually visiting my blog for wedding ideas? And do you have articles on brainstorming what to blog about??? I know there are tons of pins out there but I’m pinned out for the night. Lol
Pinterest also offers Actalike audience targeting, which is similar to Facebook’s Lookalike feature and Google’s Similar feature. A major difference, though, is that Actalike only requires an audience size of 100 users to create the audience, while Facebook and Google require much larger audiences. Also, with layering and variance of 1% to 10%, your Actalike audience closely resembles your pre-existing audience list, with similar engagement activity. This allows for personalized targeting of new, niche audiences.

The connection between Pinterest and blogging is crystal clear and can be significantly beneficial to most bloggers. SEO, or search engine optimization, helps blogger content to be seen by the millions of potential readers conducting searches on sites such as Google and Bing each day. Imagine that Pinterest is one more place for potential readers to both find and share your content, but rather than searching on Google or Bing, they’re searching on Pinterest itself.


But they will only show your first 5 pins after midnight UTC in the following tab. Then they will show the next 5 pins of the next person you follow and so on. Only when this reservoir is exhausted will they show your next 5 pins. This is the very reason it’s so important to share content throughout the day, start with your best, and not share it all at once.
How to Start a Pinterest Board That Succeeds: Are your prospects on Pinterest? Do you want to start a Pinterest board? When starting on Pinterest, you’ll want to fill new boards with quality starter pins. Once you’ve launched your new boards, it’s important to pin more content to them daily. This article shows how to develop Pinterest boards for your business.

Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.
Pinterest does not offer the option to automatically sort boards alphabetically. There are unofficial browser extensions that may be able to alphabetise boards; however, these extensions are not endorsed by Pinterest and should be used with caution. Alternatively, you can manually organise your boards alphabetically by dragging and dropping them into the desired order.

Great article and have seen others like it but not as comprehensive with fantastic ideas. However… as this topic has come up lately, the Pinterest Terms of Use state: “If you decide to use the Application, subject to your compliance with the terms and conditions of these Terms, Cold Brew Labs grants you a limited non-exclusive, non-transferable, revocable license, without the right to sublicense, for you to install, access and use such Application on a mobile device that you own or control, solely for your personal and non-commercial purposes.”


@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right. 
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