Incorporate color contrast. Color contrast is another good practice to incorporate, because it makes your images more visibly appealing and easy to read. Unsurprisingly, it helps users with low visibility be able to make out the images more clearly in many cases. Pinterest officially recommends a contrast ratio of 3.00:1, and released this image to show the importance:
Pinterest’s conversion tracking tags are a little more complicated to set up than Facebook’s, and for merchants without coding experience it can be intimidating. One of the biggest advantages of this app is that it simplifies the process of setting up Pinterest conversion tracking tags for your store. And without the tracking tags, you wouldn’t be able to retarget accurately, or track the results from your Promoted Pin campaigns.
There is a ton of advice out there for what makes a good pinnable image but what you are wanting is for people to click-through that image and not just pin it. Experiencing why you click-through to an article is better than just knowing by reading the research. If you would click the image than your audience probably will too! So when I do a search on Pinterest, and I actually click-through to the website to read the article, I will then pin the image to my “Click Through Pins” board. I then can go back and analyze what made me click-through the pins to the site and can apply the personalized research to my brand.
Now, it’s not a good idea to create Pinterest Boards that are covered in nothing but pins from your own blog. One of the cardinal rules of social media is that you promote others more than yourself. With that said, it certainly behooves you to create Boards related to your content so that you can include your own posts as a small portion of each Board.
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