One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership. 

Great post! I started using Pinterest over a week ago and my traffic increased dramatically! I really didn’t expect it! I have a little question… when I pin an image from my blog and get 100 repins for example, let’s say that this results in 500 views on my blog… shouldn’t I be gettin more and more traffic on the following days? I’ve noticed that my blog traffic only increaces when I pin…but I don’t understand how come my traffic is not multiplying as a result of the many repins I get. Instead my traffic goes back down until the next time I pin…
I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/
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Starting a new board is one of the initial steps you take towards building your Pinterest marketing endeavor. And that’s exactly when you should also baseline your analytics.See to it that you determine the most critical metrics for your Pinterest campaign, and use the data to understand what content sources you should continue using and which you should avoid in the future.
Pinterest recommends that you Pin something at least once per day, during peak times—which they’ve found to be evenings and weekends for U.S.-based brands. Pinterest also highlights that consistency is key—if you’re going to post a large number of posts over the course of a week, divide them up and post several per day rather than posting them all at once.
Traditionally, you could only access Pinterest via its web app platform. Now it's available on your desktop thanks to Pokki. By creating folders to organize the content you find online into pinboards, you'll be able to tailor your interests and even organize them into more specific sub-categories to make them searchable to other users on Pinterest. You can add an image to your Pinterest pinboard by uploading images saved on your computer directly to the app.
No one likes to follow or connect with you if you have an incomplete profile or empty board. Some marketers only create one or two pins and do not login regularly enough. As a result, this will affect the marketing plan of your brand. So, if you don’t have enough content to pin on board regularly, you can use a secret board and keep pinning to it. When you have enough pins you can share them one by one according to your requirements.
Part of the reason behind the furniture store’s Pinterest success is that the audience is already 'engaged' in projects like décor, so the people that use the app or site are essentially already planning to purchase specific products. IKEA has also taken advantage of Pinterest's new advertising formats such as shopping ads, which has helped them lower their cost-per-click (CPC).
You may notice when browsing the web now that there are various Pin This–type tools throughout online content. These Pinterest social sharing buttons are found everywhere from the beginning of a post to the images throughout the post to the end of the post next to comment and other social share buttons. In a post on the blog, Resourceful Mommy, hovering over each image provides readers with a Pin It option.

Pinterest operates differently than other popular social media platforms. Many people don’t use the network for broadcasting content to their followers — they use it to save valuable ideas, products, and content for a later time. Since many consumers save products to go back and purchase them later, Pinterest is the perfect tool for businesses selling products or content. In fact, 93% of users plan purchases with Pinterest, and 87% actually make a purchase because of something they saw on the platform.


One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
Pinterest’s conversion tracking tags are a little more complicated to set up than Facebook’s, and for merchants without coding experience it can be intimidating. One of the biggest advantages of this app is that it simplifies the process of setting up Pinterest conversion tracking tags for your store. And without the tracking tags, you wouldn’t be able to retarget accurately, or track the results from your Promoted Pin campaigns.
This has a very important implication: The more engaged and loyal your followers are, the faster your pin will take off. Pinterest has said the number of followers did not matter as much as the percental engagement. This, however, also means that users who built their accounts organically (as opposed to follow/unfollow techniques), will have a bigger benefit.
Facebook, Google, Instagram – all major sources of traffic are constantly evolving. Pinterest, however, changes more rapidly than all these three put together. At least, it often feels that way. Every 2 months or so, I see them testing out new features (as I have quite the big business account, I probably see some features that never get rolled out to average users).
I am not paying for Tailwind’s paid plan just yet. Make sure that you have either archived or deleted your boards that have nothing to do with your niche. If you frequently share other bloggers’ work, you can create a board for that. I labeled mine “Bloggers Network”. Try to schedule at least 10-20 pins every single day, spread out on different boards and definitely start using Tribes! With Tailwind’s free account, you can share up to 80 pins to Tribes, and those should be your most popular pins from your blog because those are the ones that will get repinned by other pinners within the group. I hope this helps! If you’re struggling to nail down your niche and find your blogging voice, you can check out this post https://melissablevins.com/finding-your-voice-through-blogging 🙂 Let me know if you have any other questions!
How to Use Pinterest for Videos, SlideShare and Podcasts: Do you only share images on Pinterest? Would you like to share other content to grow your followers on Pinterest and other social networks? You can also share videos, SlideShare presentations and audio podcasts and extend your exposure, thanks to Pinterest. This article explains how you can use Pinterest to increase exposure for your videos, SlideShares and podcasts.

Shop the Look Pins are exclusive to the fashion and home decor sections of Pinterest and they allow users to easily find and purchase items from the pin. Users can recognize Shop the Look Pins by the small white dots that call out the items in the pin that are for sale, and users can tap the white dot to be directed to the website where they can purchase the item.
@Patricia – Watermarks are definitely key but I know many artists who do not like them. If placed on an edge/corner of an image, they do not help against theft – anyone can crop the edge off. If placed over the center, your prospective customer can’t *see* the image clearly so I only know of one artist out of hundreds who has opted for that. I can’t see any watermarks on the link you provided- I see a page of thumbnails and when enlarged don’t see any watermarks. The second method helps protect against blatant theft, so maybe the answer is the more subtle first method. I am not sure how offering a folder of “Pinterest friendly” images would work. Anyone surfing the web can find any image you’ve posted on a blog or website and pin it and not even know a “friendly for Pins” folder exists…
Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again!
The benefits for marketers are huge. And here’s one of the biggest and best parts of Buyable Pins: Pinterest doesn’t take a cut of your sales. There’s no commission. You keep every dollar you make on the sales you get from Buyable Pins. Though that has the potential to change down the line if Buyable Pins see a lot of success, for now marketers are using them with no drawbacks.
Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
Elna, this is a GREAT post and I love your blog. I have a question… my website doesn’t have many group boards… do you have some suggestions for me? My niche is dealing with Chronic Migraines (not fun or colorful!) and I don’t know where to start. Any help is welcome. I also have a course with a free bit, but I feel uneasy putting it in my bio…. I will have to think about that…
Patricia, those are great tips too. I really wish the folks at Pinterest would get back to me about its commercial use. Maybe their initial thoughts were not for business use and now that it’s taken off as it has, they may be rethinking the rules but it would be great to have clarification because I’ll be out there creating my own business board if I feel comfortable knowing it’s in keeping with their terms!
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
Once you sign up for a Pinterest account, you’re able to begin sharing content and, therefore, social media marketing on the platform. You have the option to upload your business’ content from your computer or mobile device, Pin content you find on the platform, or add content you find on the web using the Pinterest browser button. You can also follow the boards of your friends and competitors, “Like”, and comment on others’ Pins, re-Pin (or repost) content, and share links to your website and blog in your Pins.
Me again- going through the list now and writing some things down to keep in mind for later and making changes as I go along- care to elaborate a bit more on #44 – “Do you have a number of different ideal client personas? Create a separate board to represent each client persona, then use those boards during your sales cycle and embed them into your website pages so people are clear about the kinds of clients you’re trying to attract.”
Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.
Great suggestions, Patricia – and this conversation has made me pay much closer attention to what I’m re-pinning now. I always check to see that the pin links back to a valid website. Recently I’ve seen quite a few images that just link back to the “Google Images” search page, and I definitely don’t re-pin those because it seems like that image was likely just lifted from Google.

Pinterest is one of the biggest search engines on the internet, so treat it as such with regards to keyword research (and use). Although a full primer on Pinterest SEO is outside of the scope of this article (though let us know if you’re interested in a ffollow-uparticle on the topic in the comments!), the principals are largely the same as SEO for Google.

Great post Tiffany! You write in such a common sense, matter of fact way that resonates with me for sure! I love what you said about Pinterest being a site dedicated to problems and solutions. I’ve taken many free and paid courses teaching how to use the Pinterest search bar for blog ideas, but once again, I love how you simply the process and make it make sense! Bravo to you and congratulations on your success!
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
If you’ve ever wanted a way to boost impulse buys, Buyable Pins are the answer. As users browse through Pinterest, creating boards and getting ideas, they’ll be able to see your product, the price, and purchase it all with a few quick taps or clicks on their mobile device. They don’t even have to re-enter their payment information each time they buy, making the process go quickly—before they get the chance to talk themselves out of it.
Pinterest can definitely be a useful tool for growing your business or getting exposure for new products. The capabilities of this kind of curatorial site allow you to showcase the taste of your brand in a whole new way, and definitely speak to a specific and powerful demographic. When done right, Pinterest is a great way to enhance your online presence, so have at with the pins!
If your business has seen a loss of organic traffic from the changes that Facebook has made with its business pages and with the Twitter mute button, Pinterest can increase your social media traffic once again. Pinterest has seen a steady increase in referral traffic of 27.5 percent year over year while Facebook’s share of referral traffic is down 25.8 percent.
The Pinterest Analytics Tool: How to Use It for Business: Are you struggling to measure your Pinterest efforts? The new Pinterest Analytics tool gives you access to a variety of data, including how potential customers interact with your pins beyond your website. This article shows how the Pinterest Analytics features help you get the most out of your Pinterest marketing.
Yeah, I’m seeing the same things, Linda – that was the inspiration for the document. I’ve also been working with my clients on getting started with Pinterest marketing, and the main issue that I see is a lack of focus or strategy. I think because Pinterest is so much fun, people just sort of leap in, pin a couple of images, and hope for the best. But strategy is just as important with Pinterest as it is with other social media tools like Facebook or Twitter.
Then, I’m about to help you. Instead of rehearsing all the old news (like updating your profile pic and getting a business account. duh!) I tried to focus on very actionable items. Unique techniques I use every day that helped me drive a constant 5,000 visitors to my site. each. day. The information is based on official interviews and quite a couple of e-mail conversations with Pinterest (so no urban myths, sorry!), but also empirical evidence from stuff that worked out for me.
Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
Really awesome information . I worry about the copyright part of it all,but am very careful about what I pin or repin. I love Pinterest and use it almost daily. I add some of my products,but wasn’t sure if I could promote my business. Now that I read your 10 commandments I am going to share my work,but carefully. I didn’t know you could add prices. So glad that I can do that.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
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