I started using interval because I was hugely paranoid about spamming group boards (it took me ages to even get up the courage to post anything to the first one, lol) and mainly because I thought it would be good to drip the content out over time rather than in one big rush. Initially I thought that I could just keep each pin cycling through my group board list indefinitely, but that doesn’t take into account that as I make more pins, they start to stack and I might overwhelm the boards.
The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.

Pinterest images should be long and narrow to take up the maximum amount of visual space and get noticed! Look at your favorite pins and see what the images have in common so you see what types of images are repinned and shared. I create images that are up to 735 pixels by 1102 pixels. This creates an engaging invitation to repin your pinned article.


Promoted Pins (aka Pinterest ads) are a great way to get your Pins seen by more people, creating new exposure for your brand. But Promoted Pins can provide exposure well beyond what you pay for. Internal Pinterest data shows that advertisers get an average of 20 percent more organic clicks in the month following the launch of a Pinterest ad campaign.
And why not? Pinterest currently has 250 million monthly active users and according to Pew Research, a whopping 29% of U.S. adults use Pinterest.When compared to other social media platforms, Pinterest is definitely on the smaller side. But what makes it an interesting option is the fact that people using the site are actually engaged with it. Which means, you have a higher chance of getting people to click-through to your site from Pinterest, than say, Twitter.
Ad group. This is where you decide on your budget, where to display your ads, your target audience, and how long the ads will run. Also, depending on the objective, you can have more than one ad group in each campaign. For example, if you’re a clothing retailer, your campaign can focus on driving traffic to your website while each ad group is dedicated to specific products — one group for women’s dresses and another for men’s suits.
You likely already have a number of Boards on your Business Pinterest Account. If not, you need to stop right now, and create Boards that resonate with both your business and your market. Pin it full of mixed content like products, household tips, lifestyle images and more, all revolving around your Board theme. Post related links back to your blog, too.
Then, I’m about to help you. Instead of rehearsing all the old news (like updating your profile pic and getting a business account. duh!) I tried to focus on very actionable items. Unique techniques I use every day that helped me drive a constant 5,000 visitors to my site. each. day. The information is based on official interviews and quite a couple of e-mail conversations with Pinterest (so no urban myths, sorry!), but also empirical evidence from stuff that worked out for me.
This checklist serves as a lead magnet to attract the right people to sign up for her mailing list. She included a sign-up box for this checklist in relevant blog posts and regularly published these articles on Pinterest. Besides organic pinning, she also promoted some of the pins to a more closely targeted audience through a paid Pinterest ad campaign.

Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.


These are two vastly different approaches to the same end result – getting users to click on the pin and go through to your lawn mower’s product page – but the first example will only help you acquire users who were interested in finding a lawn mower in the first place, while the second example will help you appeal to users interested in having a beautiful lawn and a well-kept home. By appealing to user’s interests through this type of content on Pinterest, they’ll be more inclined to purchase your product because you’ve demonstrated how your product can help them achieve the results they want.
15. Social Media Examiner: Social Media Examiner doesn’t exclusively publish Pinteret or visual marketing tips, but the ones that are published here are of the highest quality as they are written by people who have a vast knowledge of Pinterest. So make sure you read their posts on using Pinterest for business regularly. They also have some good articles on visual marketing.
While Pinterest is well-known for its food, health and travel posts, it’s also a platform that can take ordinary or even dry topics and make them engaging and interesting. For example, website developers and financial planners all successfully use Pinterest to teach “dry” topics like banking and coding. Divorce attorneys and project managers can offer their most helpful content to those who are searching for answers or the latest inspirations on that topic.
When pinners save something, it provides a clue to Pinterest on what the person is interested in so that they can build a unique and optimized smart feed for that individual. Also, make sure to create pins with great images to maximize the probability that people will save them. You also want to make sure your descriptions and board names are keyword optimized.
Social Warfare is one such WordPress plugin that enables the use of social share buttons and Pinterest marketing. Besides being able to use it to set a custom Pinterest image and fallback, their Pro version also has a unique feature called “Pin image for browser extensions”. When turned to the ON position, this toggle adds your custom Pinterest image to the choice of images to Pin when a visitor uses a browser extension to Pin. Social Warfare Pro starts at $29/year for a one website license.
You are dead on George. It is the pretty butterfly of the moment. I do believe people hang out there a lot and I do believe it drive traffic. But I don’t have faith that already saturated people can split their time with yet another platform. I am to the point where I am recommending to people – if you want to try out a new platform figure out which platform you are willing to give up. You can jump on Pinterest just because your friends are on there.
While creating and sharing content for your Pinterest profile and marketing to users, be sure to keep your target audience in mind. Similar to the way you would when creating new products, developing your branding, or posting to other social networks, you want to ensure you’re pushing out content that appeals to your target audience, current customers, and buyer personas on Pinterest.
One of the things I hear over and over again from Pinterest users–individuals and businesses–is that we don’t want Pinterest turning into another sales pitch ghetto as users plug their MLM products or Etsy sites or corporate product lines. The primary reason that Pinterest is so successful is its organic and cooperative nature. There are, as you listed, many ways (at least 54 it would seem) to promote a business or brand without resorting to carnival shilling and Web 1.0 scorched earth tactics.
Pinterest is all about the visuals. From infographics, to charts, to advice guides, your brand should increase your visual content in order to reach your audience. General Electric (GE) is a great example of a company that uses Pinterest to show off their products. GE has a board called “Badass Machines,” which illustrates different technologies that are produced by the company. Examples include wind machines, aviation engines, and locomotives. While any company can post pictures of their products, GE does things a little differently: They post visually stunning images that are either filtered through an editing program or taken at an interesting angle. The combination of the two amps up their Pinterest page, while promoting their brand in a cool new way. This is something any B2B organization can do, no matter the product or service.
There is one caveat, though. They said that square pins are okay as well. Now, when I say “they said”, they are speaking from a pure UX point of view. It’s what they want because it has the least design problems. What they want and what really works are two things altogether. Google has been droning on an on how important switching to SSL is, but as of now, it still is not an important ranking signal. So, I feel you should stick to the 2:3 ratio but ever so often create different sized pins and experiment a bit. Why? Because it might be your chance to stick out!
Even though Pinterest is a visual search engine, descriptions are what help users find what they’re looking for when they search for specific content on Pinterest using keywords. When creating descriptions for your pins, besides using keywords that users are searching for (which you can discover by using a tool like KWFinder) make sure that every pin’s description is evergreen so it has the greatest amount of lasting potential.
When pinners save something, it provides a clue to Pinterest on what the person is interested in so that they can build a unique and optimized smart feed for that individual. Also, make sure to create pins with great images to maximize the probability that people will save them. You also want to make sure your descriptions and board names are keyword optimized.

Give your paid pin time to get ranked by the Pinterest algorithm - it takes click-through rate into account, so it’s best to leave it to run for a little while, at least 7 days, to let it gain momentum. The longer the campaign, the easier it is for Pinterest to optimize performance. Campaign results for the same pin or ad group (group of promoted pins) can vary enormously, depending on duration.
You need to make sure your ads follow our standard ad guidelines and any country-specific guidelines. You need to follow all applicable local laws, regulations and industry codes for any area your ads will be shown in. You must also follow our community guidelines, terms and the above advertising guidelines. These advertising guidelines apply to all parts of your promoted content, including the image, description and destination—and they apply to features like audience targeting.
If you’re familiar with Adobe Photoshop, it’s another tool you can use to create Pinterest content. If you want to use Photoshop to create your Pinterest images but need a crash course in how to actually use Photoshop, we recommend checking out Skillshare’s photoshop classes, a few of the best ones you can see curated in our 40+ Best Skillshare Classes for Business article.
Pinterest is designed to store ideas and inspiration in a way other social media sites aren’t. Users are encouraged to organize what they find into different board names for easy navigation, and most pinners are primarily on Pinterest seeking and saving what they want to see; they generally don’t care if other people see what they've tagged or archived, because it’s just not about generating discussion or exchanging information.
These are two vastly different approaches to the same end result – getting users to click on the pin and go through to your lawn mower’s product page – but the first example will only help you acquire users who were interested in finding a lawn mower in the first place, while the second example will help you appeal to users interested in having a beautiful lawn and a well-kept home. By appealing to user’s interests through this type of content on Pinterest, they’ll be more inclined to purchase your product because you’ve demonstrated how your product can help them achieve the results they want.

Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
Now that you have your boards create, you want to create customized board covers. Taking the time to do this will help you to establish your professionalism and solidify your unique identity on Pinterest. Board covers allow you to put your branding on the front of every board, which gives your profile a polish that most business profiles don’t have.
21. You pin anything. It’s easy to get lost in a sea of stunning images where you might find yourself repining anything that catches your eye. Don’t do it. As a brand, you’re trying to relay a message that portrays what your business is all about. Plan out your boards and outline what message or information you want your fans to walk away with before you start pinning.
Pinterest users typically use the platform to save ideas and products that you want to remember or revisit later. It is also used to bookmark articles or blog posts that you want to read later. Pinterest is different from other “social media” networks because it focuses more on research and inspiration. While Facebook and Instagram focus more on sharing information or posting about your life, Pinterest is for inspiration, research and buying.
Give your paid pin time to get ranked by the Pinterest algorithm - it takes click-through rate into account, so it’s best to leave it to run for a little while, at least 7 days, to let it gain momentum. The longer the campaign, the easier it is for Pinterest to optimize performance. Campaign results for the same pin or ad group (group of promoted pins) can vary enormously, depending on duration.

Then I edit the picture in Adobe Photoshop. This IS important. Your original image might not be suited for Pinterest as it does not get your idea across. I often extend the sky (to have some good background) or enlargen certain landmarks or combine multiple images into one. Say you got a whale on the one picture and a boat on the other, but the pin is about whale watching, so do cheat a little.
If you’re familiar with Adobe Photoshop, it’s another tool you can use to create Pinterest content. If you want to use Photoshop to create your Pinterest images but need a crash course in how to actually use Photoshop, we recommend checking out Skillshare’s photoshop classes, a few of the best ones you can see curated in our 40+ Best Skillshare Classes for Business article.
Website traffic. When the goal is driving website traffic, Pinterest charges for clicks to a website (CPC). An important note on this campaign type is that advertisers are only charged when users click to acess your website directly from the promoted pin. There is no charge for clicks from a repinned pin. Those clicks are marked as downstream or promoted traffic and are highlighted in the campaign report.

I created my Blog in July but, had to take a break from working on it as I am pregnant and you probably know how suffering and difficult the first trimester can be. Now that I have completed this period I am back to work but, sometimes I feel that I am not getting anywhere and feel like an idiot dreaming with something that it will never come to be true. I don’t have any money to invest on professional help, SEO, etc.
As we discussed at the beginning of the article, content on Pinterest successfully gains engagement and shows up as a search result for months, so the content of your titles and descriptions need to be able to withstand that test of time. Titles and descriptions that are evergreen – as in, they don’t date themselves or refer to a very specific day or time of the year – have greater lasting potential. Some content on Pinterest will be season specific, such as content for recurring holidays, and that’s okay, but think about how you can even make descriptions for seasonal pins stay relevant for the same time of year next year.
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
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